Jun 18

Restoring lost Chrome Tabs

For some reason today my Mac decided it didn’t want to work any more and essentially froze up. It was getting slower over the morning and eventually ground to a halt. I think I might have been able to wait it out and kill some stuff but I ended up hard resetting it. When the machine came back most everything recovered…except for Google Chrome’s tabs.

Google Chrome had opened and left me with a blank window without the normal “It looks like Chrome crashed, do you want to restore the tabs?” button. I have the “Continue where you left off” setting so I’m not sure why that didn’t kick in either. Restoring the tabs restored tabs from one window out of the 10 or so windows I had but also interspersed some tabs I’d closed prior to the crash. A quick Google search for “restore closed tabs after quitting Chrome” gave me a lifehacker article which covered the process. It had some notes on prevention but it had a “Recovery Mode” section which mentioned editing the “Local State” file and changing the “exited_cleanly” entry to be “false”.

The article covers four files in the User Data Directory that are relevant to session and tab restore: Current Session, Current Tabs, Last Session and Last Tabs. The suggestion in “Recovery Mode” is to restore these files. Given I’d lost this data, I wasn’t sure what else had gone so I decided to stop Chrome, rename the “Default” user data directory and then restore the one from an hour ago back in place. Once the restore was done, I edited the “Local State” file as mentioned above and started Chrome. Chrome started and showed the “Chrome didn’t shut down correctly” bar and gave me the option to restore my tabs.

To put this in bullet form, the steps to fix this:

  • Stop Chrome.
  • Go to ~/Library/Application Support/Google/Chrome/ and rename “Default” to something else. (TIP: You can use SHIFT + APPLE + G in Finder you can paste the path to go straight to that folder).
  • Connect to Time Machine.
  • Restore the “Default” folder from the Time Machine backup into ~/Library/Application Support/Google/Chrome/ again.
  • Go into the “Default” folder, find the “Local State” file and open it with TextEdit.
  • Find the line with “exited_cleanly” on it, change it to be “false” and save the file.
  • Start up Google Chrome and click on “Restore” in the bar where it says “Chrome didn’t shut down correctly”.
  • All of your windows and tabs should be restored!

This process is very similar to the one for restoring lost Safari tabs. The important piece in both of these cases is to have regular routine backups. Time Machine on Mac OS X provides hourly backups automatically which is invaluable when these sorts of issues occur. Any routine backup solution will work properly (e.g. CrashPlan), you’ll need to adjust the steps to be appropriate for your platform.

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Apr 16

Migrating to pfSense as gateway router

Category: Uncategorized

For the longest time I’ve used an AirPort Extreme as my gateway router. When I moved to the US, I purchased an Airport Extreme 5th Generation and it worked well. It tied in with a Mac Mini Server I purchased at the time and the Mac OS X Server application integrated nicely with the device to handle port forwarding. I also set up Cacti in a Linux VM to monitor this device over SNMP and that worked reasonably well. Then Apple redesigned the AirPort Utility to become a much simpler interface. A lot of the settings and control that used to be there disappeared with the version 6 release. AirPort Utility 5.6 provided extra details like logs and a list of wireless clients with their relative connection strength. For a while I continued on using Airport Utility 5.6 with various levels of hacks to keep it working. Somewhere along the line I also ended up picking up a 6th Generation Airport Extreme to play with the 802.11ac support and found that it lacked many of the features like SNMP that the 5th generation supported. In a recent move I ended up coming across the 6th generation first, unpacked it and set it up as my main gateway but was disappointed by the lack of introspection into the device which put me on the path of looking at pfSense.
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May 2

Staying at companies too long and rethinking manufacturing

Category: Uncategorized

Another post that floated through my Facebook feed was a Forbes article on employees who stay in companies longer than two years get paid 50% less. These are always interesting because I’ve seen everything posted in this article including the too many jobs too soon. If you are in an industry in demand then that gives you flexibility though not everyone has that flexibility. Silicon Valley has a lot of competition for everything so it‘s likely a bad example more broadly. For example I wouldn’t expect a teacher to be able to make the same sort of beneficial changes. Which makes me wonder for the future of many of these jobs: if there isn’t upwards pressure on wages then it’s likely they’re stagnant or decreasing.

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Apr 1

Luck, the Government and how Silicon Valley became Silicon Valley

Category: Uncategorized

A while back a posting from the Singapore Business Times entitled “Start-ups risk ‘going astray’ in two scenarios” came into my Facebook stream. I commented with the following:

Governments are rarely good at leading investment in these spaces. If you look at the story behind Silicon Valley, it’s pure luck. A bunch of brilliant people got stranded in the south bay and then went on to build lots of iconic companies from a single very profitable company. These people also paid it forward to the next round of start ups that they felt would be successful.

The reply that I got suggested that Silicon Valley wasn’t luck and it wasn’t lead by government. The reply implored me to review the Wikipedia page stating it was very good. So I did just that and here is that analysis in addition to some insight from a report on How Silicon Valley became Silicon Valley.

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Jan 20

Restoring lost Safari tabs

Recently I’d been having hardware issues with my Mac which resulted in quite a few hard shutdowns for the machine. Once I got up and running I found to my surprise that I’d managed to lose all of my Safari windows and tabs of which I had in abundance. This was rather distressing as I have far too much research on topics open at any given time for anything from stream processing systems to certificate authorities to research on containerisation to creating grids in AngularJS. Suffice to say I wasn’t excited at the prospect of losing that information.

A quick Google search gave me a bit of hope. There was an article on Mac OS X hints about “Safari loses all your open tabs: recover using Time Machine“. It suggests using a tab backup extension but failing that you can recover it from Time Machine. I have Time Machine backups so this one was easy.

The steps to get this sorted were:

  • Stop Safari.
  • Connect to Time Machine backup.
  • Look for ~/Library/Safari/LastSession.plist in the Time Machine backup (if you press “SHIFT+APPLE+G” and then paste that address, Finder will take you directly to the file).
  • Restart Safari and go “History” -> “Reopen All Windows From Last Session”

Once I did that all of my windows and tabs were restored! As an aside I got curious to see what was in the file and if you are curious too there are a few ways to open up a plist file like this one.

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Nov 6

NAB – More Give, Less Take (of Honest Reviews)

Category: review

So recently my NAB account popped up a little option to “review” my account and put it on the website. I was invited to review my “NAB Classic Banking” account but I got an email back saying that it was rejected for the following reasons:

  • Your review contained a reference to a customer service interaction that is not specifically related to the NAB product under review.
  • Your review contained content that was inappropriate or unrelated to the product or service you reviewed.

They have a whole heap of review guidelines so I figure if that’s the reasons it’s not been published the other reasons are likely not why they’re not going to publish it.

So I figure if NAB won’t publish it, I’ll publish it myself for the world to see and make up their own mind. Perhaps “customer service” isn’t something they feel is related to their product. Or perhaps reviewing the internet banking bundled with their product wasn’t what they were expecting and wish to exclude internet banking as a product that isn’t a part of the product they offer. Confusing! Onwards to the review!
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Aug 6

Huawei Modems and Mac OS X Mountain Lion

So I don’t have access to my old Huawei modem with my new Mountain Lion box however some comments on my earlier article indicate that the same steps that go Huawei Modems working on Mac OS X Lion also work for Mountain Lion as well. I’ve updated the earlier post title to reflect this and put an update there. Very cool however that it does appear to mostly work.

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Jul 18

Practical Experience: Turning knowledge into understanding and complex reasoning

Building on my previous post about knowledge, understanding and complex reasoning I’d like to present a practical example of how taking basic knowledge and piecing information together to form understanding helps to resolve problems. And how building understanding of multiple connected areas allows for complex reasoning and complex problem solving.
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Jul 9

Knowledge, Understanding and Complex Reasoning

Category: education,thoughts

One of the concepts that has perhaps stuck with me most from high school is the differential between knowledge, understanding and complex reasoning. It is perhaps the piece that stood out for me from high school maths and it really was the composition of the exam. However I feel it’s a valuable distinction to make and helps guide that learning process. Essentially the three form a pyramid with knowledge on the bottom, understanding in the middle and complex reasoning forming the capstone. The exams were functionally composed of these three sections: knowledge, understanding and complex reasoning. Each tested different aspects of learning the topic and appeared proportionally to where they existed on the pyramid.
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Mar 17

Adventures with NAB Internet Banking

For the most part I’m usually happy with NAB Internet Banking. They have a reasonably nice web interface and it also scales down reasonably well onto a mobile device. Functionality wise it has a lot of capabilities including some I wished Wells Fargo had (international transfer being the primary one) and I’m yet to find myself wanting from it. However there are some quirks and it seems just recently, I hit all of them.
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